EPA Cleanup Funds Will Help Transform Vacant Properties in Easton’s Historic District into Thriving New Center

EPA Cleanup Funds Will Help Transform Vacant Properties in Easton’s Historic District into Thriving New Center

EASTON, Md. – July 19, 2014 – (RealEstateRama) — Today, EPA Regional Administrator Shawn M. Garvin joined Governor Martin O’Malley and former Governor Harry Hughes for a ground-breaking at the site of what will become the new Eastern Shore Conservation Center in Easton’s historic district. The redevelopment project, supported by state, federal and local funds, will transform the former McCord Laundry Building and several vacant 1850s row houses along 114-130 S. Washington Street into a thriving campus of offices, residences and outdoor public venue.

In praising the project, Regional Administrator Garvin congratulated the Eastern Shore Land Conservancy (ESLC) for its leadership and commitment to helping spur economic development and healthy livability in Easton and nearby towns. He announced a $200,000 EPA brownfields grant to the ESLC — who is spearheading the redevelopment — to clean up remaining hazardous and petroleum contamination at the site.

“EPA shares in the ESLC’s vision of creating healthier and economically stronger communities,” said Regional Administrator Shawn M. Garvin. “We’re pleased to join forces with the State on this project that will help create 50-75 high quality jobs and provide lasting benefits for the Town of Easton and other local communities for years to come.”

ESLC will use EPA’s brownfields funds to remove and dispose of contaminated soil, install impervious materials to prevent stormwater infiltration, and remove three underground storage tanks.

Since 1997, communities and non-profit groups in Maryland have received EPA brownfields funding that has resulted in over 170 assessments and cleanups of properties. The program supports communities nationwide in their plans to redevelop and reuse contaminated properties. Brownfields are properties at which moderate or perceived contamination can threaten environmental quality and public health, and can interfere with redevelopment.

For more information about this project see: http://cfpub.epa.gov/bf_factsheets/gfs/index.cfm?xpg_id=8670&display_type=HTML.

For more information about brownfields see: http://www.epa.gov/brownfields.

Contact Information: Bonnie Smith, 215-814-5543

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) leads the nation's environmental science, research, education and assessment efforts. The mission of the Environmental Protection Agency is to protect human health and the environment. Since 1970, EPA has been working for a cleaner, healthier environment for the American people.

EPA employs 17,000 people across the country, including our headquarters offices in Washington, DC, 10 regional offices, and more than a dozen labs. Our staff are highly educated and technically trained; more than half are engineers, scientists, and policy analysts. In addition, a large number of employees are legal, public affairs, financial, information management and computer specialists.

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