Architects Report: Crowdfunding Becoming Financing Catalyst for Stalled Real Estate Projects and Community Initiatives

Architects Report: Crowdfunding Becoming Financing Catalyst for Stalled Real Estate Projects and Community Initiatives

Report Documents Impact of Crowdfunding as Alternative Way to Raise Capital for Smaller Projects

Washington, D.C. – February 4, 2013 – (RealEstateRama) — Crowdfunding, the practice of investing in projects through the use of a crowd-supported web based fundraising campaign, shows significant promise for attracting investors to smaller real estate projects and getting them off the architect’s drawing board, according to a report issued today by the American Institute of Architects.

According to the white paper, “Crowdfunding Architecture,” the increasingly popular tool is being used to leverage dedicated internet fundraising websites to spur community support and financing for an assortment of infrastructure ventures that would ordinarily have difficulty finding money due to their smaller size.

The report, compiled for the AIA by massolution, inc., concludes that “donation-based crowdfunding” holds the most potential as a financing tool for beleaguered developers and architects. According to massolution’s May 2012 “Crowdfunding Industry Report,” the amount of money generated by crowdfunding was close to $1.5 billion in 2011, of which almost half was raised via donation-based crowdfunding.

That’s because the donation-based crowdfunding campaign model relies not on providing tangible returns for its success, but rather the enthusiasm of a local community for causes such as covering an individual’s medical expenses, political campaigns or community projects that would otherwise require municipality or government funding for completion, the report concludes.

For the architect, who is often the primary catalyst for new projects and construction, the crowdfunding concept holds special promise. Usually architects’ role in funding projects is limited. But crowdfunding increases the role of architects in the funding cycle by providing investment models and communications tools for a broad array of self-selected projects, from pedestrian bridges to urban skyscrapers, the report notes.

Crowdfunding Architecture” details specific examples where crowdfunding has already had an impact in providing financial support for community projects that were too small to get started with traditional financing methods. A link to the report can be found here. A link to the AIA’s database of Stalled Projects can be found here.

About The American Institute of Architects
Founded in 1857, members of the American Institute of Architects consistently work to create more valuable, healthy, secure, and sustainable buildings, neighborhoods, and communities. Through nearly 300 state and local chapters, the AIA advocates for public policies that promote economic vitality and public well being. Members adhere to a code of ethics and conduct to ensure the highest professional standards. The AIA provides members with tools and resources to assist them in their careers and business as well as engaging civic and government leaders, and the public to find solutions to pressing issues facing our communities, institutions, nation and world. Visit www.aia.org.

Contact:
John Schneidawind
202-626-7457

http://twitter.com/AIA_Media

SHARE
AIA

For over 150 years, members of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) have worked with each other and their communities to create more valuable, healthy, secure, and sustainable buildings and cityscapes. By using sustainable design practices, materials, and techniques, AIA architects are uniquely poised to provide the leadership and guidance needed to provide solutions to address climate change. AIA architects walk the walk on sustainable design. Visit www.aia.org/walkthewalk.

Contact:

Scott Frank
Phone: 202-626-7467

The American Institute of Architects
1735 New York Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20006-5292

Phone: 800-AIA-3837 or 202-626-7300
Fax: 202-626-7547

Previous articleCommunity Power Works Uses Housing Data to Make the Emerald City Even
Next articleFirst-time homebuyers in East King County offered help with down payments