New Action Taken to Clean Up Polluted South Jersey Site

New Action Taken to Clean Up Polluted South Jersey Site

Congressman Norcross: More Needs To Be Done

Washington, DC – October 1, 2015 – (RealEstateRama) — Rep. Donald Norcross (NJ-01) today welcomed action by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to clean up contaminated soil from approximately 33 residential properties at the Sherwin-Williams/Hilliards Creek Superfund site in parts of Gibbsboro and Voorhees.

The EPA approved a $14 million plan to remediate the site, which includes a former paint manufacturing plant and the waters of Hilliards Creek, which flows into Kirkwood Lake.

The agency previously stated the site and groundwater beneath the former paint manufacturing facility contain contaminants including leadarsenic and volatile organic compounds, all of which pose serious long-term health hazards.

“It is imperative that the toxic contamination at this site and at homes is addressed to protect people’s health,”  said EPA Regional Administrator Judith A. Enck.

The soil at the site will be dug up and properly disposed. The EPA is promising to coordinate this effort with affected residents to ensure disruption to their property and lives is kept to a minimum.

“This is only a first step. This site has posed a threat to my constituents for far too long. I’m working aggressively to identify ways to accelerate a complete cleanup at this site, so neighbors can have peace of mind knowing they’re living in a safe community,” said Rep. Norcross.

A comprehensive plan to remediate the entire Sherwin-Williams/Hilliards Creek Superfund site is underway.

Alice Johnston of the Kirkwood Lake Environmental Committee previously stated: “Residents are happy to see that efforts are finally being made to begin cleanup of residential properties but dismayed that the lake cleanup is still far in the future per EPA plans. We hope the EPA will push forward to mandate dredging of the lake in conjunction with the rest of the cleanup efforts in order to preserve our precious lake and affected ecosystem. The lake is dying, and cleanup simply cannot be delayed much longer.”

To view the Sherwin-Williams/Hilliards Creek Superfund web site, click here.

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